Studies show joint parenting may be best for children

Studies show that children are often better developed if they have significant interactions with both parents after a divorce.

When parents file for divorce in Kansas, it is crucial to put the best interests of the children in the forefront. Although separation and divorce may be extremely difficult for children of any age, studies show there are some ways that parents can make the transition easier on their kids. While many people believed that it is best for a child to reside in the sole custody of one parent in order to maintain a consistent atmosphere, researchers have found that joint-custody may be best for kids.

The study

Researchers analyzed 33 studies that focused on the development of joint-custody children vs. children who were raised in a sole-custody environment. The results, published in the Journal of Family Psychology, showed that kids who spend a significant amount of time with both parents are better adjusted in comparison to kids who spend the majority of their time with just one parent. During the meta-analysis, 814 joint-custody children, 1,846 sole-custody children and 251 kids in intact families were evaluated.

The results

Researchers discovered that the kids raised in joint-custody environments generally had higher self-esteem, better relationships and higher school performance than those in sole-custody families. Furthermore, kids who spent a fair amount of time with both parents had fewer emotional and behavioral problems. The study illustrates how, in most cases, kids need continual contact with both parents in order to develop proper life skills. Even if parents have to travel to exchange the children on a regular basis, kids do better overall when they have both parents in their lives.

Parenting roles

This research backs the belief that each parent plays an important role in a child's life. Toddlers with active fathers are more emotionally secure, are able to explore their surroundings and are more sociable than those who do not spend time with their fathers. The U.S. Department of Education reported that children who have access to their fathers on a regular basis earn better grades, have less depression and have less behavioral problems.

Fathers encourage kids to step out of their comfort zone and take risks while providing a safe and secure environment. They are a key part of disciplining children with authority. Mothers, on the other hand, reason with children and attempt to influence child's behavior through loving encouragement.

Finding a legal advocate

If you are going through a divorce, you may want to consider speaking with a family attorney regarding your legal options. A lawyer in Kansas may be helpful in answering your questions and pointing you in the right direction when it comes to making crucial legal decisions.